Posted by Adaptable Leadership - Building Leaders for Changing Times on 8/19/2008

John Agno publishes The Leadership Blog where he often catches my attention with resourceful insights. Recently John's blog, Retain Talent: Develop Leaders, describes why it is essential to invest in the development of your most valuable asset: people. I enourage you to take time to read it.

1 comments:

John Agno said...

Thank you for linking to my posting on training leaders. The goal for training leaders is to help them behave well in the moment to handle whatever situation they face.

Many managers mistakenly assume that leadership style is always a function of personality rather than strategic choice. Their leadership style is based upon their innate signature talents and this represents their default leadership behavior. However, leaders can choose a different leadership style that best addresses the demands of a particular situation.

Being unaware that we can change our leadership style to match the situation at hand, we unconsciously engage our default behavior. Only when we become aware of something, are we able to make choices as to the action we wish to take. The ultimate leadership responsibility is modeling the behaviors you expect from others. To a large degree, leaders operate in a fishbowl. Employees are constantly watching the leader--and learning from him or her.

Throughout his long and storied career, Colin Powell has resisted chasing the latest management trend or fad. To anyone who would listen, Powell has always advocated the benefits of adopting a 'situational approach' to leadership instead of the 'one size fits all' approach that is favored by so many management consultants these days.

In Powell's experience, flitting furiously from fad to fad only serves to create confusion within your team and diminishes your credibility as a leader. Worse still, blindly following a particular management theory can also generate unnecessary rigidity in your thoughts and actions. This, argues Powell, can be disastrous. To quote Powell, "Some situations require the leader to hover closely; others require long, loose leashes. Leaders must understand that management techniques are not silver bullets or magic mantras, but simply tools that can be reached for at the right times, as circumstances dictate."

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